Why are we not building enough homes in the UK?

It is widely reported that not enough houses are being built in Britain and this has been the case for decades. From the early 1950s to the early 1980s the UK built between 200,000 and 300,000 new homes every year. In 2016, it was around 140,000. With an ever-expanding British population and a shortage of residential accommodation this has created a housing crisis.

In 2007 the Labour government famously set a target for the construction industry to build 240,000 new houses every year. The question is: Why has this not happened? Instead of increasing the number of new build houses, the number has gradually dwindled. This has caused a severe housing shortage in the UK and hikes in property prices in many areas across the country.

Why such a shortage of new build homes?

A plethora of reasons have been identified for why we are not building more homes in the UK. These include:

  • A skills crisis in the construction sector
  • Lack of space
  • Too much red-tape
  • Bureaucratic planning laws
  • Land banking by developers

What is the solution?

With a fragile housing market, it is more important than ever for tradesmen to provide Insurance Backed Guarantees and Deposit Protection on their installations. As the government look at new ways to boost the UK’s house building rate, the CPA will play a larger part in helping traders and consumers in an unpredictable market.

House building on brownfield sites, reductions in red tape, and better training opportunities are excellent ways to help the building industry to thrive. Sourcing more cost effective materials is also an excellent way to increase affordability in the housing market. Investing in steel, timber, and mortar today will help to develop a brighter future for building companies, manufacturers, and society as a whole.

To become a member of the CPA and promote your business’ image contact us on 01462 850064. For more information on our range of services, call us, send us a message online, or browse our website.

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